Entrepreneuring first, exporting later

The head of Kiwisac aimed to open up a niche market in changing bags for mothers and now hopes to take them to the foreign market

[dropcap type=”circle” color=”#ffffff” background=”#4f4f4f”]M[/dropcap]any are the voices that encourage putting a business idea into practice. As are those that see exporting as the only way to maintain profits in the current economic climate. Núria Martell is an example of both premises. In 2008, she decided to start up a business inspired by her daughter: street-wear changing bags for mothers that can be fitted on prams. “I wanted them to be modern, colourful bags that could be used as street wear,” she explains.

[quote align=”center” color=”#999999″]In 2008 she started up a business inspired by her daughter: street-wear changing bags for mothers that can be fitted on prams.[/quote]

In just a few years, she has consolidated her business with yearly revenue of €500,000. First, she established a network of salespeople to meet demand on the national market and after a few years decided to move into exports. Portugal and Benelux were the first destinations, but sales abroad have now stagnated: the crisis in Europe has made distributors more conservative. “They don’t want to take a risk on new products; as the situation in Europe isn’t good, they prefer well-known brands,” she says.

In order to re-boost penetration of Kiwisac abroad, Núria Martell is seeking external guidance in finding the best market for her product. Right now she is considering South America. “Backpacks are popular in Israel, while in Germany consumers look for eco-friendly products or those made from recycled materials,” she says. The aim is to find the right market.

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